Edible Plants

Broadleaf Plantain (Common Plantain)

Plantago major

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Broadleaf Plantain is a perennial broadleaf plant that grows in many locations from spring to autumn. Not only is this a vital wild edible plant for overall good health, this wild weed can be used to treat chronic diarrhea as well as digestive tract disorders. Broadleaf plantain is packed with nutrients and is safe to ingest. If a person chomps on some fresh leaves, these can be applied to the skin to treat minor burns, insect bites or open wounds.

Fields of NutritionFields of Nutrition has medicinal benefits and vitamin/mineral content of Broadleaf Plantain (click here).

Distinguishing Features: Broadleaf plantain has green, oval to egg-shaped leaves that grow in a rosette. These leaves have thick stems that meet at a base. When these stems are broken, they reveal string-like veins that resemble those in celery. Long-pointed, green, petite flowers grow from the base; these also contain a small pod housing dark seeds.

Leaves: The leaves grow in a rosette and can range from 5 to 30 cm in length. Plantain leaves have stems that contain string-like veins and these veins are seen on the leaf. There are five to seven prominent parallel veins from the base. Leaves are generally broadly lance-shaped to egg-shaped, are hairless or sparsely short haired.

Height: Can grow to a height of 12cm.

Habitat: Can be found growing throughout Ontario and most of North America as well as in Europe and Asia in meadows, pastures, lawns, roadsides, gardens, and waste places.

Edible parts: The entire plant. Young leaves can be eaten raw or cooked. They are somewhat bitter and tedious to prepare because it’s generally preferable (though not required) to remove the fibrous strands before use. Many people blanch the leaves in boiling water before using them in salads in order to make them more tender. Once blanched, plantain can be frozen then used later in a sauté, soup or stew. Seeds can be eaten raw or cooked and can be tedious to harvest. The seed can be ground into a meal and mixed with flour. Dried leaves make a healthy herbal tea.

Wild Food Recipes: Baked Plantain, Chicken Weed Wrap, Nutty Plantain Snack, Plantain Salad, Sesame and Wilted Green Saute, Wild Pizza

 
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All information, blogs and web content contained in this website is Copyright © EdibleWildFood.com 2011. All photography, unless otherwise stated was taken by Karen Stephenson. All photographs are Copyright © EdibleWildFood.com 2011.